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Author Topic: banking buddy  (Read 14376 times)

bao luo

  • Guest
banking buddy
« on: March 25, 2015, 09:22:21 am »

As we've all experienced at some time or another, Chinese banking is rarely as straightforward as it is back home. Tan (first name) did an awesome job helping me with remittance at China Merchant Bank (Sanxiaokou branch) today.

三孝口支行, 合肥市长江中路436号金城大厦
China Merchant's Bank 436 Changjiang Middle Rd

Master's graduate of Northwestern, speaks good English. So if you have any banking needs give him a call or Weixin, both on 13395693887.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2015, 09:30:10 am by computer_says_no »
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x0vash0x

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2015, 12:04:52 pm »

I find one of the easiest solutions is to use PayPal.

Step 1: Create a U.S PayPal account and link it to your foreign bank account.
Step 2: Create a Chinese PayPal account and link it to your domestic bank account.
Step 3: Send money from your Chinese PayPal to your U.S PayPal.
Step 4: Use PayPal to buy whatever you want in USD or withdrawal it to your U.S Bank Account.

Thing I like about it: it bypasses the bank entirely. No need to make any special trips to the bank to send money.

Edit: All told, the process takes about a week to get verified and link bank accounts and all that, but after that, it's smooth sailing.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2015, 12:07:23 pm by x0vash0x »
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YetAnotherCanadian

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2015, 06:09:38 pm »

I find one of the easiest solutions is to use PayPal.

Step 1: Create a U.S PayPal account and link it to your foreign bank account.
Step 2: Create a Chinese PayPal account and link it to your domestic bank account.
Step 3: Send money from your Chinese PayPal to your U.S PayPal.
Step 4: Use PayPal to buy whatever you want in USD or withdrawal it to your U.S Bank Account.

Thing I like about it: it bypasses the bank entirely. No need to make any special trips to the bank to send money.

Edit: All told, the process takes about a week to get verified and link bank accounts and all that, but after that, it's smooth sailing.

Interesting. Can you transfer any amount from China Paypal to American PayPal?
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bao luo

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2015, 10:47:15 pm »

I did try to set up PayPal China about but ran into difficulties trying to get my account verified. So after some back and forth with customer service and creating of new accounts I gave up.
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x0vash0x

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2015, 11:21:47 pm »

Interesting. Can you transfer any amount from China Paypal to American PayPal?

I believe so. I've send USD 2,000 from China to U.S without any problems.

Quote
I did try to set up PayPal China about but ran into difficulties trying to get my account verified. So after some back and forth with customer service and creating of new accounts I gave up.

That sucks. Like most things, your experience may vary. But, for me it was painless. I did have to send PayPal an email to verify my Chinese bank account, but all they needed was my US Passport and a Chinese Utility Bill with my name on it. Took about a week for them to process the documents.
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bao luo

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2015, 06:43:07 am »

For anyone remitting money at the bank, here's exactly what you'll need for everything to go smoothly:

1. Evidence of salary in the form of payslips or letter from your company (both must be chopped). This should cover a period in which your
    salary >= the amount of remittance. (If possible, also have the phone number of your company's accountant on hand).
2. Evidence of tax payment in the form of official, stamped receipts from the government tax office. Again, This should cover a period in
    which you salary >= the amount of remittance. (bring a photocopy of these)
3. The full and complete details of the target bank, incl. subbranch name, address and local identifier, SWIFT code, exact account name and
    number. If you type it all out in Chinese it makes things way easier.
4. Your current address and phone number
5. Passport + photocopies of the ID and visa pages.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2015, 09:25:56 am by computer_says_no »
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x0vash0x

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2015, 08:00:35 am »

For anyone remitting money at the bank, here's exactly what you'll need for everything to go smoothly:

1. Evidence of salary in the form of payslips or letter from your company (both must be chopped). This should cover a period in which your salary >= the amount
    of remittance. (If possible, also have the phone number of your company's accountant on hand).
2. Evidence of tax payment in the form of official, stamped receipts from the government tax office. Again, This should cover a period in which you salary >= the
    amount of remittance. (bring a photocopy of these)
3. The full and complete details of the target bank, incl. subbranch name, address and local identifier, SWIFT code, exact account name and number. If you type
    it all out in Chinese it makes things way easier.
4. Your current address and phone number
5. Passport + photocopies of the ID and visa pages.


This seems WAY more complicated than PayPal. I actually tried to ask for tax information from my employer and hit a brick wall. Couldn't get them to get my tax certificate or anything like that! That's why I did PayPal: not need to deal with any Chinese bureaucracy.

Although, question for people who might take this route. Must you present this information every time?

Another issue, are you concerned about fraud at all? I'm personally very weary of giving so much personal and bank information to Chinese officials. Mostly because you never know who might eventually get a hold of that information.
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bao luo

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2015, 08:36:11 am »

Quote
Couldn't get them to get my tax certificate or anything like that!
You've gotta really stick it to these HR departments when they're blatantly not doing what they should. Get stuck into 'em -- it's your right to have proof of salary and tax payment.

Not sure of the limits for remittance using PayPal, but I'm talking about more sizeable amounts, i.e., $10K+

Your employer should definitely be giving you proof of monthly payment, but it's quite common for schools not to bother. For anyone working in a school, you should keep salary and tax records, even if it's in the form of a chopped letter from your school accountant once a semester. At least get a printout of your bank statement from the ATM every payday. If you request tax payment certificates, they must get it for you. Don't wait until you have a pressing need before you try to obtain them. Some people might also need them to claim tax offsets or rebates back in their home countries.

You should be able to obtain records yourself down at the local tax hall (probably easier if you know where they're paying your tax). It's a good way to know for sure that they're actually doing it; if they're NOT, then it's SAFEA or lawyer time.

Quote
Although, question for people who might take this route. Must you present this information every time?
yes. Basically the government needs proof that you've legitimately earned and paid tax on an amount of money greater than or equal to the amount you're seeking to remit.

Quote
Another issue, are you concerned about fraud at all?
I'm not at all concerned about ID fraud within the banks. If it happened, I would view it as an anomaly. ESL recruitment is where the majority of ID theft occurs.

One good thing is that China will be opening up its capital account and will lift a lot of these restrictions on outflow, but we're not there yet.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 09:12:47 am by computer_says_no »
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x0vash0x

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2015, 02:34:51 am »

This information is relevant to those with ICBC.

You can open a Forex (Foreign Exchange) Account and remit money online. It's a flat fee of 140RMB no matter how much money you send back.

I did this through my wife's account since her account already had a Forex account.

I'm under the impression that foreigners can open a Forex Account by going to their local ICBC branch and showing the required documents. But, I'm not positive on what the required documents are.
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bao luo

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2015, 08:31:59 am »

Yes, if you're wiring money through the account of a Chinese citizen it's easier. However, if you're remitting through your own account, you always have to show proof of income and tax payment every time you remit.
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x0vash0x

  • Guest
Re: banking buddy
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2015, 09:37:29 am »

Yes, if you're wiring money through the account of a Chinese citizen it's easier. However, if you're remitting through your own account, you always have to show proof of income and tax payment every time you remit.

So, foreigners can't open a Forex account?

I'm honestly a little fuzzy on the exact details of how this would work. But, I was told that I could open a Forex account if I showed some employment documents. If that's the case, it would be a one time deal.

I think if you go to the bank to remit money, you would need to show proof every time. I think if you open a Forex account its a one time deal.

Again, I don't know if foreigners can open a Forex account or how that would work, but it would be interesting to find out.
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